Arthur Beck: Money an Art

Sometimes we forget that the rich and powerful is just as much people as the rest of us, with the same quirks, curiosities, and troubles as everyone else. Sure they have more money to resolve the everyday problems, but the big problems still stay with them, and their interests are sometimes surprisingly mundane, just as they are curiously exotic. Arthur Becker is one such man, a wealthy real estate mogul who made his fortune purchasing tech companies during his days as a Bear Stearns stockbroker. These days he’s making a move from being a silent partner to actively participating in building projects and separating from his wife of 20 years in between collecting toy soldiers and ancient currencies.

One supposes when you have the kind of currency as Mr. Arthur Becker, you’ll find yourself with a surfeit of time in which to pursue various arts and curiosities. Most of us may get into baking cookies, but how many of us would venture into purchasing entire macadamia nut orchards to supply companies like Mrs. Fields?

He also has an artistic flair and an interest in the fundamental arts that go into his real estate. Consider his foray to Vermont where he began restoring 18th-century homes, this taught him an appreciation for hand-made bricks such as those that are going into his 465 Washington Street project. It was his appreciation of the art that made him seek out a Denmark company to produce handmade bricks. You can visit Crunchbase for more details.

Arthur graduated from Bennington College in 1969 with a degree in the Fine Arts and then added a business degree to his acumen during his time at Amos Tuck in Dartmouth. He put this degree to good use when he became CEO of two technology companies. His work goes beyond simple financial concerns, though he does still focus on money as a point of interest. Currently, he’s exploring the meaning of money and its central place in our lives and relationships. If you’d like to see some of his work, it’s been exhibited in a number of installations and can be viewed at his office or at the newly built Sullivan townhouses where an exhibit will be curated by James Saloman. More details can be found on Bloomberg.

See more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/real-estate/vera-wang-wealthy-nabs-30k-month-union-sq-rental-article-1.2244221

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